Unbreakable, Your Name, & The Plight of P.E.

Unbreakable – The hype around the new movie Glass got to me, and so I felt I should see Unbreakable in order to gauge my interest in watching it. Unbreakable is certainly creative, but at times very dull. I found the twist to be interesting even if it was slightly predictable. Regardless, I do not think this movie is as creative as Shyamalan thinks, nor does it affect me quite the same way as Sixth Sense did when that twist ending was revealed. M. Night Shyamalan often seems to think he is more clever than he truly is, and at times that comes off pretty poorly in this movie. It is fine but not a must see by any stretch. 6.5/10

Your Name – This film is so beautifully made, that it is hard to have a lot of genuine qualms with it. The animation is stunning, watching how the contrasting landscapes work in unison is truly special. What impressed me most about this movie was it took a concept that could have easily been used in a cheesy and ineffective way and it made it incredibly meaningful. My one problem is that the timelines can get slightly confusing, and I wish the resolution helped resolve a little more of the time jumping. In one of my favorite movies Arrival, it takes a similar view of time and in my judgment works better simply because it uses its template to effectively narrate the story. While this movie certainly does a great job, it missed some opportunities to make it even better. Regardless, it is a must watch but not quite as good as Spirited Away. 8.8/10

Students are more likely to be bullied in middle school than at any other point in their academic careers, and P.E. presents a particularly ripe opportunity for abuse, whether because the class forces them to use a locker room, where adult supervision is limited, or because it facilitates the teasing of overweight or unathletic kids.

This story by Alia Wong has had me thinking about my experience in P.E. in school and wondering how it helped or hurt my interest in fitness. For me, it helped as it gave me an environment where I felt confident and could excel. Then again, I am sure P.E. would be very discouraging for others who could not quite keep up or even were slightly below the curve. All this seems to do is decrease fitness at older ages, as many use their middle school memories of Physical Education and associate that with any form of working out in general.

Fitness should be made enjoyable and worthwhile to the people who are participating, especially for those at a young age. It is not surprising that putting people in an environment where they can feel exposed and bullied is not the most rewarding experience for kids who maybe are not quite as talented. I wonder if we could spark enjoyment in activity without reducing fitness to timed runs and arbitrary benchmarks, and if that would make it more fun for everyone involved.

If we want to be a healthier society, it is vital that we focus on making fitness fun for kids. Frankly, while I understand we live in a society that is “coddled” or “soft”, putting kids in an environment where they feel horrible about their athletic abilities will only further isolate kids not make them stronger. All it seeks to do is alienate kids from something important to their health for the rest of their lives. We can keep kids having fun outside and make P.E. more about having fun and then get into the more challenging competitions as kids get older.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s