Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind & Charles Murray’s The Curmudgeon’s Guide to Getting Ahead

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind – I was hesitant to watch this movie because I simply assumed it would use a clever convention to tell a different permutation of the same rom-com story. This movie differentiates itself by investing in the characters, those in and outside of the main relationship. What kind of people would do this and what kind of people would perform these procedures? All of these questions are tackled in unique perspectives, and the twists at the end create for a satisfying narrative. That being said, I found this film slightly lacking emotional bite, which I think may have been solved by watching this in a theater. Regardless my experience was never quite as impactful as I hoped, bringing down my overall score. It is still worthwhile, and I have a feeling with the right audience it would be incredibly impactful. 8.5/10

“If something about your prospective spouse bothers you, but you think that you can change your beloved after you’re married, you’re wrong” (135).

Charles Murray was caught up in a wave of controversy in 2017, as his book The Bell Curve became a source of seeming unending controversy at universities, including the University of Michigan. While I did not attend the event with Charles Murray, it was a sad state of affairs for everyone involved. While I understand the implications behind his study, and why people would be concerned, I have no reason to believe the data collection was done incorrectly. Regardless, the reasoning for including racial IQ scores does not seem to have been entirely thought through, which makes me feel slightly uneasy about him. We all make mistakes, and I feel as though he is important to still listen to, even though some of his past work may be questionable at best.

The Curmudgeon’s Guide to Getting Ahead had been sitting on my desk for a while and I was not sure how to really look at it. However, after reading through it, I found parts of The Curmudgeon’s Guide to be genuinely enlightening, and it has left me with many thoughts and questions to ask. Tips about testing yourself and thoughts about non-judgmental society have left me in deep contemplation, and I hope to get to ask him questions about it in the future and write a review on it. While I was not as enthralled with the advice on how to present yourself in the workplace, other sections make this book important reading for all 20 year-olds. This one of the more important books I sat down to read, and even if you hate Charles Murray, you will find something in here that is valuable.

My Guide to 2018

I am a bit late on this but I thought it would still be a good idea to go over my year in smaller tidbits. It was a year of personal growth and change, and while many seem to despise 2018 I could not have asked for a more incredible year. Here are some highlights.

Favorite Movie: Minding the Gap – Bing Liu’s masterful documentary struck a cord with me I could never quite shake, as its chronicles of skateboarders transitioning into adulthood are joyous and heartbreaking. I used to skateboard when I was little, and so I understood the motivation these three people felt. It was a way to break rules and to rebel from what was expected of you, or to challenge yourself in new ways. The underlying motivations for skateboarding turn to their home situations and also towards domestic abuse, creating a powerful portrait of life in America. A must watch. I gave it a 9.7 and I think that is modest if anything.

Runner-up: First Reformed – Paul Schrader’s haunting tale of a Reverend having a crisis of faith is the most topical and relevant film to come out in 2018. It is slow and intentionally still, creating an austere sense until it breaks its own rules. Amanda Seyfried is most impressive, as she plays the woman who can most understand the two men who are at the focal point of this story. Please do me a favor and see it. It is truly special.

Favorite Book: When Breath Becomes Air – A book I picked up off of my uncle’s shelf quickly turned into one of the most searing and poignant books that I read this year, as the pain, trauma, and delight of a neurosurgeon in his final days was a beautifully rendered story. It is tough and heartbreaking, but it finds a way through sheer determination to find its voice, and for Paul to get the auto-biography he always deserved. A book I loved and I think others will as well.

Runner-Up: A Storm of Swords – While I am still not finished with this book, George R.R. Martin continues to amaze me with his deep and empathetic take on characters most of us would have looked away from. This was the first in the series to dig deep into many of the villains of this story, and it makes for incredible reading and deep emotional thought. Certain scenes killed me, and the major deaths in this story keep the incredible shock-value, but what I was consistently amazed by was Martin’s care for everyone in the story.

Favorite Moment: NIRCA National Championship Meet – It is hard to overstate how incredible my experience was running in freezing cold Shelbeyville, Indiana with my club track team. All of our hard work came to fruition, and we had a blast while doing it. I can not thank my team enough for all they have given me and I hope to get to go to more incredible meets in the future.

Defining Change in Character: Openness – So much of my time before 2018 I spent my time in a bubble, resulting in stereotypes about people who live outside of my own. After spending a year away from home and traveling the midwest as well as meeting people from all over, I had the incredible opportunity to meet people from the furthest corners and reaches of the midwest and beyond. This has allowed me to be much more open to new experiences and new people, and my slight fear of breaking my bubble has turned into exuberance to discover others.

What will define 2019: Resolve – 2019 looks to be a year that will be hard, with a lot of goals set and plenty of things to achieve. My hope is that by the end of 2019 I can be in an even better spot than I am now, and that will take strength and resolve to get through it. I know I, as well as you can, but it will take time. To an amazing 2018 and an even better 2019.

Vice Review, Jane, & Inception

This movie often seems to equate clever filmmaking with good historical commentary, and that simply is not the case.

This is from my latest Michigan Review article, a movie review (I can see how shocked you are) of the movie Vice. If I had to give a score out of 10 it would be a 3. No I was not a fan, and much of that is due to its aimlessness and lack of clear ideas. My review is essentially a hybrid of Brian Tallerico’s review and Kyle Smith’s review. Kyle Smith also does a fact-checking article which for those of you looking for a conservative perspective may want this take.

I also watched a few other movies, Janethe terrific documentary on Jane Goodall, and Inceptionthe trippy and brilliant Christopher Nolan genre-blender. One thing I loved about these films was there differences in scale and approach but both do a marvelous job of bringing out their subjects. While Jane Goodall is real and the people in Inception are not, what makes both films exceptional is there sincerity towards finding out their characters motivations. Each of these films could have become distracted but neither did.

Perhaps why I am saying this is to address my problem with Vice. It never gets an argument and it never takes time to truly develop the characters, which makes the film dull and lackluster. It is disappointing, especially with such a great cast and crew. Regardless, Vice did not impress me as the other two I mentioned did. I would give a 9/10 to both Jane and Inception.

 

No End in Sight & First Reformed

No End in Sight – In preparation for a film review I am writing for The Michigan Review on the movie Vice, I decided to watch this documentary about the Iraq War. This is the best critique of the Iraq War I have ever watched, as it interviews public officials who were in charge of implementing policy and change in Iraq. It shows the numerous misfires and missteps, and focuses particularly on the months before and following the invasion. It shows an inexplicable level of ignorance, by those at the heights of power. I was impressed with how thorough and honest it was, it never felt like I was watching a Michael Moore film. For anybody interested in knowing more about this period in our history, this is a must-see. 8.7/10

Will God forgive us for what we have done to his creation?

First Reformed (Available on Amazon Prime)This quote comes from Paul Schrader’s latest effort First Reformed, a haunting portrait of our present moment in America. Reverend Ernst Toller loses one of his parishioners in a suicide due to his anguish over climate change, and that begins a crisis of faith for our Reverend. The movie is meticulous and almost shockingly still, but evokes a calm that disturbs and cuts deep. Ethan Hawke is terrific, in his pained performance, and the earnestness of this film ultimately comes through. Of all the films to come out in 2018, this is perhaps the most important. It captures religiosity, our changing world, and what happens when we are left behind. It is necessary viewing.   9.6/10

Also I know I have been late to it but I will do a guide to 2018, so stay tuned for that if you are interested!